Charity Partners

Welcome to our charity partner page. Here you can learn a little more about our chosen charities. Click on the logos to go to their pages and learn even more. If you want to donate directly to them please feel free.

British Divers Marine Life Rescue


Since 1988, BDMLR have been involved in the rescue of marine wildlife after every major marine disaster, including the Braer shipwreck in Shetland and the Sea Empress grounding in Milford Haven. Seal rescue has remained a major component of the our work, with BDMLR medics rescuing seals in all seasons. Over the years, many hundreds of seals have been helped, BDMLR working closely with specialist rehabilitation facilities to ensure their long term care and eventual return to the wild.

Although seal rescue has remained a key component of the work of the charity, it has become progressively more involved in the response to stranded cetaceans in the UK. BDMLR were founder members of the Marine Animal Rescue Coalition (MARC), an affiliation of organisations with an active interest and involvement in the management of marine mammal strandings in the UK, with a primary focus of improving the response to live cetacean strandings. This has been achieved through the sharing of information and opinions, encouraging training and equipment, and consideration of the options available for the disposition of beached animals in the context of UK strandings patterns.

Every year, BDMLR trains over 400 volunteer Marine Mammal Medics and has 20 whale rescue pontoons located at strategic points throughout the UK, waiting to help stranded whales and dolphins.

 

 

Ghost Fishing UK


The problem of ghost fishing gear has reached public prominence over the past five years. It is a normal part of fishing that nets, shellfish traps and other equipment becomes lost. This is not a deliberate or careless act on behalf of the fishing community, simply a reality of a very harsh environment. The problem is that the lost gear continues to catch marine life. This has an undocumented effect on the local ecosystem, but is clearly undesirable in any sense. Animals are being needlessly killed. Ghost Fishing was set up to try to remove this lost equipment from the marine environment. It is a challenging and difficult task. Ghost gear is typically entangled in reefs and wrecks, and its removal can be complicated. The technique involves attaching bags to the gear, which the diver fills with air, making them float. The divers then cut the gear free as close to the seabed as possible. Great care is needed to ensure that the diver does not become entangled with the equipment. This involves a high degree of teamwork, coordination and discipline.

 

 

The Manta Trust


Our goal is a sustainable future for the oceans, where manta rays and their relatives thrive in healthy, diverse marine ecosystems.
Formed in 2011, the Manta Trust is a UK and US-registered charity that co-ordinates global mobulid research and conservation efforts. Our team is comprised of a diverse group of researchers, scientists, conservationists, educators and media experts; working together to share and promote knowledge and expertise. Our mission is to conserve mobulid rays, their relatives, and their habitats, through a combination of research, education and collaboration.
The Manta Trust takes a unique, multifaceted approach to mobulid conservation, which sets us apart from others in the field.

 

 

 

Surfers Against Sewage


We began as a response by the surfing community to the dreadful state of our beaches. Those hardy souls who ventured into the water back then often found themselves swimming in raw sewage. There’s tales of sanitary towels on heads and human poo sandwiched between bodies and boards. Completely unacceptable.
The campaign grew loud, proud and strong and thanks to the passion and perseverance of our members — the UK now enjoys some of the cleanest beaches in Europe.
Of course it’s not just surfers who care passionately about our coastlines — our members are swimmers, dog walkers, paddleboarders, beach cleaners, kite surfers, sandcastle builders, ice cream eaters and sun bathers too. We protect it because we love it and that’s where we feel most at home.
We’ll always care about Water Quality issues and our Safer Seas Service continually monitors sewage spills in real time on beaches around the UK. But ‘Plastic is the new sewage’ as it is now the biggest threat to our beaches, our precious marine eco-system and our happiness.