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Every year, BDMLR trains over 400 volunteer Marine Mammal Medics and has 20 whale rescue pontoons located at strategic points throughout the UK, waiting to help stranded whales and dolphins.

Since 1988, BDMLR have been involved in the rescue of marine wildlife after every major marine disaster, including the Braer shipwreck in Shetland and the Sea Empress grounding in Milford Haven.

 

 


 

When communities commit to protecting their coral reefs, we commit to providing the services and tools they need to enforce managed fishing zones, measure impact, and build social cohesion around effective stewardship. Agreements ensure we work from a common plan: a 20-year shared vision, complementary commitments, finance plans, means of avoiding conflict, and capacity to be developed. Through an equitable and respectful process, we serve community needs.

 


Established in 1997, the Shark Trust remains the only UK registered charity working to advance the worldwide conservation of sharks through science, education, influence and action.The Trust is an effective and well respected advocate for shark management and protection, undertaking a range of projects, campaigns and policy work to ensure the survival of this integral apex predator of our oceans.

 

 


 

Manta rays are among the most charismatic creatures that inhabit our oceans. With the largest brain of all fish their intelligence and curiosity make encounters with these creatures a truly amazing experience.

However, despite their popularity with divers and snorkelers many aspects of these creatures lives remain a mystery, with only snippets of their life history understood. More worryingly, in recent years, a fishery for these animals has developed with devastating effects on populations of these animals globally.

 


‘Ghost Fishing’ is what fishing gear does when it has been lost, dumped or abandoned. Nets, long lines, fish traps or any man made contraptions designed to catch fish or marine organisms are considered capable of ghost fishing when unattended, and without anyone profiting from the catches, they are affecting already depleted commercial fish stocks. Caught fish die and in turn attract scavengers which will get caught in that same net, thus creating a vicious circle.